recombinant dna research paper

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Recombinant dna research paper

The use of recombinant r- DNA technology to produce genetically engineered organisms started in the early s with the pioneering transfer of genes between bacteria of the same Escherichia coli species. This facilitated the widespread commercial availability of insulin at a price affordable to patients with the metabolic disorders types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus, who either fail to produce or to metabolize sufficient insulin.

This proof of principle demonstration of the translational medical benefits of genetic modification pioneered a trend in biotechnology for molecular cloning methods to transfer genes expressing desirable traits into another host organism thereby producing favourable characteristics.

This now involves both prokaryotes such as bacteria comparatively routine to modify genetically by r-DNA technology and eukaryotes including yeast, plants, insects and mammals comparatively complex to manipulate via r-DNA technology. The latter is a waste management technique that deliberately introduces GMOs into a site to neutralize environmental contaminants breaking down hazardous substances into less toxic or non-toxic compounds with the aim of cleansing thoroughly, quickly and cheaply polluted soil or water.

For each use there will be costs as well as benefits, all of which should be considered rationally when coming to an informed decision whether to use genetic modification on an industrial scale. In agriculture development of genetically modified crops with a purpose to improve both yield and resistance to plant pests or herbicides seems to have gained a degree of public acceptance and is already practised in a commercial context in several countries.

This was developed in to express the trait of delayed softening of tomato flesh as a practical means to minimize post-harvest crop losses. Nevertheless, the introduction of a genetically modified fruit paved the way for use of GMOs in food and today genetic modification is widespread. The introduction of pest-resistant brinjal also known as eggplant or aubergine was met with criticism in some countries, in contrast to the concurrent popularity of pest-resistant cotton.

Both attempts at implementation followed incorporation of the identical crystal protein gene Cry1Ac from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis Bt into the genome of the host plant expression of which synthesizes so-called Bt toxins that confer resistance to predation by lepidopteran insects. However, of the two uses as a food and as clothing the one which caused anxiety among the general public involved human consumption.

The benefits to humans of using Bt toxin should be stressed in an attempt to overcome the initial unpopularity of consuming Bt-brinjals in developing countries such as India, 7 Bangladesh 8 and Philippines. Drug delivery systems in medicine that are based on bacterial or viral hosts could prove hazardous if either the organism is genetically unstable and converts to a pathogenic type or if purification is incomplete. Consequently, identification of a preferred system to safely and efficiently deliver an altered gene of choice has become a priority as the technology advances from development and laboratory research to clinical translational trials.

Pseudomonas putida and Nitrosomonas europaea are the organisms which are typically utilized in bioremediation. The objective is to isolate the original genes located in these bacteria that promote bioremediation, then modify and incorporate them into a suitable host to be used as a bioremediation agent usually E.

Hence, stringent monitoring of in situ bioremediation is essential. This achieves the purposeful generation of antibiotic-resistant organisms which, if mishandled, could become problematic under natural conditions. An appreciable biotechnological success and novel commercial application is the production of genetically modified fluorescent zebrafish, Danio rerio, and similar species using genes encoding glowing characteristics.

In the event of release, inadvertent or deliberate, into the environment the survival capacity of these constantly fluorescent fish is markedly reduced due to increased vulnerability to predation compared to wild type fish; thus, the risk of sustained ecological impact is considered to be marginal. In evaluating eukaryotic organisms as suitable for genetic engineering, there are ethical issues to be considered, such as the possibility of GMOs released into the environment as bio-controlling agents becoming pathogenic to non-harmful organisms.

Notably, this occurred for the entomopathogenic hyphomycetous fungi Lagenidium , Coelomomyces and Culicinomyces used to kill Anopheles and Aedes mosquito larvae as a supposedly environmentally friendly means to combat the major vector-borne diseases malaria and dengue. In choosing to exploit r-DNA technology for developing novel GMOs public education should be an important consideration. A high level of acceptance is required in order to attain societal trust in and use of a given product and thereby to achieve its economic success.

On an industrial scale, use of GMOs is gaining recognition as a technologically feasible means to obtain desired agricultural, biological and biomedical products. For the most part, manufacture is carried out in bioreactors under tightly controlled conditions the use of which minimizes the possibility of inadvertently producing an environmental hazard. During the development process, the effect that a GMO has on the ecosystem into which it is released should be investigated thoroughly in a series of controlled trials prior to progressing to industrial production.

Selection of a non-pathogenic organism is also important to ensure operator safety of handling during purification, processing and distribution. Matters of contention surround such fundamental aspects as the creation of organisms containing an altered genome and the inheritance of modified genes by the offspring of such animals or plants.

In agriculture, for example, these include the possibility of elimination of wild type plant cultivars in the absence of insect pest resistance, insects developing resistance, elimination of organisms which consume modified plant material, and existing non-target secondary pests becoming primary pests.

Ultimately, the prospect of exploiting r-DNA technology to create humans with apparent superior characteristics, thus afforded an enhanced capacity to perform various gene-determined tasks, has been of significant concern to the general public ever since this became a reality with farm animals and pets.

However, such a vision is still futuristic since at present r-DNA technology remains a hugely debatable concept based on what we know of safety and ecological concerns. Nevertheless, the trialling of essentially the same genetic modification techniques in plants and animals other than humans has made significant progress which, from an ethical perspective, only heightens the surrounding debate.

The utilization of genetic engineering in the production of transgenic organisms is a recent major development in the agriculture, medicine, bioremediation and biotechnology industries. In spite of the now widespread use of GMOs the potential for less obvious long-term ecological impacts is acknowledged.

The acceptance by the lay public of genetically engineered products appears to be affected by perceived increased risk to personal health and to the environment, especially when relating to food production and consumption. Ecological impacts observed to date have proved much less threatening and occurred with less frequency than public perception would suggest. However, in some notable cases GMOs have had an adverse impact on wildlife due to both determined and undetermined changes.

In summary, it is reasonable to assert that the use of GMOs in a diverse range of fields is safe within carefully selected and strictly controlled environments. Nonetheless, given our incomplete understanding of the impact of applying currently available r-DNA technology more widely and over longer periods continued vigilant monitoring is necessary. This is in order to observe for any possibility of unforeseen side effects in the environment and then as required to take action to mitigate against any adverse events.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and build upon your work non-commercially. Withdrawal Guidlines. Publication Ethics. Withdrawal Policies Publication Ethics. Home JABB Application of recombinant dna technology genetically modified organisms to the advancement of agriculture medicine bioremediation and biotechnology industries. Journal of. Mini Review Volume 1 Issue 3. Keywords: biotechnology, genetic engineering, genetically modified organism, recombinant DNA, transgenic.

History The use of recombinant r- DNA technology to produce genetically engineered organisms started in the early s with the pioneering transfer of genes between bacteria of the same Escherichia coli species. Range of uses r-DNA technology has been exploited in order to provide selective improvements in various specialties that include crop agriculture, pharmaceutics, gene therapy, vaccine design and bioremediation.

Agriculture In agriculture development of genetically modified crops with a purpose to improve both yield and resistance to plant pests or herbicides seems to have gained a degree of public acceptance and is already practised in a commercial context in several countries.

Medicine Drug delivery systems in medicine that are based on bacterial or viral hosts could prove hazardous if either the organism is genetically unstable and converts to a pathogenic type or if purification is incomplete. Regulation On an industrial scale, use of GMOs is gaining recognition as a technologically feasible means to obtain desired agricultural, biological and biomedical products.

Construction of biologically functional bacterial plasmids in vitro. Genetically modified organisms and aquaculture. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Johnson IS. Human insulin from recombinant DNA technology. Plasmids are versatile vectors which can be used in many bacterial species and eukaryotes such as yeast. Plasmids can also contain the necessary signals for the DNA they contain to be expressed as a protein and are thus called expression plasmids.

The ability to produce protein from DNA contained in plasmids allows us to make recombinant protein which is useful both for biological study and also for using proteins as therapeutics, such as recombinant insulin. DNA can be placed into vectors using a variety of methods. The first method we will discuss is by using restriction endonucleases.

These are enzymes, isolated from bacteria, which bacteria use to protect themselves from viral attack. Depending on how they cut, some cut the DNA flat, cutting both strands at the same point, termed blunt ends, while others cut the backbone at different points resulting in small sections of single-strand DNA, termed sticky ends Table 2. Once cut with a restriction enzymes, two pieces of DNA can be joined together by mixing them and adding the enzyme DNA ligase.

DNA with complementary sticky ends produced by restriction enzymes join together easily with the base pairing of the sticky ends helping speed the process. Ligation of DNA with blunt ends is also possible but this occurs with a lower efficiency i. Combinations of restriction endonucleases can be used in order to ensure that DNA pieces are joined together in a defined way.

Good examples of these assembly techniques are splicing overlap extension PCR and Gibson assembly, the latter having been used to generate an entire bacterial chromosome from scratch. With these PCR-based techniques, DNA fragments are created with ends that overlap, through using primers that can bind to both sequences. Gibson assembly is similar but instead uses an exonuclease enzyme to cut back the one strand of the DNA, forming sticky ends akin to those formed in restriction enzymes.

A Splicing overlap extension PCR—indicative diagram. Two separate PCR are done with some overlap between the middle primers. These amplify the two pieces of DNA you wish to splice together. The two products from the first reactions are complementary and thus anneal linking the two fragments together. B Gibson assembly. These result in two PCR products, which have a region, which is complementary. An exonuclease enzyme is added which removes single strands from each end producing sticky ends, similar to those produced by restriction enzymes.

The exposed ends can then be annealed and ligated. Both splicing overlap extension PCR and Gibson assembly can be scaled to join multiple fragments together. The ability to make an entire genome using techniques like Gibson assembly opens up the possibility of designer organisms, designing a whole bacterial or eukaryotic cell to do a specific biotechnological role.

One of the greatest achievements of modern times is perhaps the human genome project. In normal PCR, you extend by adding nucleotide tri-phosphates, within the sequencing reaction if a ddNTP gets incorporated then this cannot be extended further by PCR so the reaction terminates. If those di-deoxy are labelled, then the fragments produced can be separated by size using capillary electrophoresis this works on the same principle as gel electrophoresis but on a smaller scale and then this used to read the sequence.

When the technique was first developed, the di-deoxynucleotides were labelled using radioactive phosphate, but more modern versions of the technique use different coloured fluorescent dyes to label the ddNTPs Figure 5. This method allows you to sequence up to approximately — bases in length before accuracy is lost. The DNA is then separated by size through electrophoresis and the base at the end at each point can be read, depending on the dye label colour ; B Illumina: DNA is fixed to spots on a slide and amplified by PCR such that each spot contains multiple copies of one piece of DNA sequence.

Those that bind are detected at each point on the slide, by visualising the dye. The dyes are then removed, and fresh-labelled deoxynucletides dNTPs are added which enables the cycle to be repeated and the sequence read. The beads are then placed onto a slide. This pyrophosphate is detected through enzymatic conversion to ATP and then the ATP is detected by the enzyme luciferase, which converts ATP to light which can be measured.

Once measured, a different dNTP is then washed over and the cycle repeated in turn to read the sequence. In sequencing, if there is a run of the same base then these are read at once as they will produce a brighter light signal, e. D Ion Torrent: DNA is attached to the base of a well, amplified and made single stranded as per other sequencing techniques. This hydrogen ion release is detected by measuring the pH change. Similar to sequencing, if there is a run of the same base in ion torrent sequencing then these are read at once as they will produce a bigger change in pH.

As the DNA passes through the membrane, there is a change in the electrical properties measured across the membrane which is different for each base. These electrical changes are measured and used to read the order of the bases passing through the pore. It is important to put the bases in context, in that a typical bacterial genome is 4 million base pairs and the human genome 3 billion base pairs, so to be able to sequence an entire genome, we need to extend this method and we do this by what is termed shotgun sequencing.

The genome is split into small fragments either using restriction enzymes or by using sonication [sound waves] to break up the genome into small fragments. These small fragments are placed into vectors and then sequenced. Once sequenced the individual sequences are then assembled by using computer algorithms to put together overlapping segments in order to build up an entire genome.

While Sanger sequencing was used to generate the first human genome in , since then a number of other DNA sequencing techniques have been developed. Like Sanger, both these techniques use DNA polymerase and added nucleotides to perform sequencing. Further,third generation techniques have been developed including ion torrent and nanopore sequencing. A PCR is then performed resulting in each spot containing multiple copies of the fragment, effectively amplifying the final signal.

Bases are then washed over the slide, with a fluorescent dye blocking the further extension. This means that each fragment is extended one base at a time, with a different fluorescent dye depending on the base added. Once the base is read using the dye, the dye removed, enabling extension and bases washed over again Figure 5.

The numerous spots on the slide make it possible to sequence a large number of fragments in parallel. The downside of this technique is the short read lengths of 50— bases, which can make the assembly of the sequences to make a larger one difficult for repetitive regions of DNA. However, if you have a reference sequence then it is possible to use this to aid computer assembly process.

These beads are then transferred onto a slide containing wells that are one bead in size. A primer and DNA polymerase is added and nucleotides are then run over the slide in turn. The sequence is read by measuring this pyrophosphate that is released when the complimentary base is added at the end of the fragment as part of the action of DNA polymerase. The pyrophosphate is measured by enzymatically converting it to ATP.

The light produced is then measured electronically. Unlike Illumina and Sanger, if there is a run of the same base then multiple bases can be added at the same time and thus the level of the light emitted relates to the number of that particular nucleotide at that point; for example, CCC will be three times brighter than C. Read lengths from can be as long as bases. In order to produce genome sequences, next generation techniques are often used alongside Sanger sequencing, the latter being used to bridge areas with larger repetitive elements, which require a longer read length.

Third-generation sequencing techniques use a different approach which measures charge change when DNA is synthesised either directly in the case of ion torrent sequencing or across a membrane in the case of nanopore sequencing. Again a primer is added along with DNA polymerase and nucleotides are then flooded over the slide in turn.

The release of hydrogen ions is measured using a pH meter. Like , if there is a run of bases then multiple bases can be added at a single time and would be reflected in a larger pH change. Read lengths of approximately base pairs have been achieved using this method.

Nanopore sequencing involves threading the DNA template through a pore in a membrane. This threading is done using an electric field, similar to the principle seen in electrophoresis earlier. To do this, a single-stranded DNA is passed through a pore in a membrane. The bases passing through are either measured by a change in the electrical properties, characteristic for each base Figure 5 by measuring the electrical difference across the membrane.

As part of the process, a helicase can be used to generate single-strand DNA Nanopore sequencing offers the potential of long read lengths than other techniques and it also does not require a PCR step prior to analysis as required for other sequencing methods. Sequencing machines as small as a USB dongle have been developed which sequence DNA using the nanopore method, enabling DNA sequencing to be performed outside of the traditional lab setting.

For experimental reasons, you may wish to change the DNA sequence. Changing the DNA from the normal termed wild-type to something else is called a mutation and these can have positive and negative effects. This can be simply changing a single base from one to another, a point mutation, or much larger deletions and insertions of sections of DNA.

This can be done randomly by using something that mutates DNA, for example, UV light or a chemical mutagen, which may be useful in some cases. These however make random changes and often the experimentalist wishes to make specific changes to the DNA sequence and this can be done in a number of ways which we will now explore. First, the simple way to do this is to perform PCRs with a mutation within the primer, which will result in the PCR product containing the mutation.

While this will work for mutations at the end of a sequence, often there is a need to introduce mutations into the middle of a sequence or to make deletions or to join DNA together. When using this technique, the mutation you wish to perform is encoded by the middle primers, and this can be used to either make point mutations in the middle, delete portions of DNA or join portions of DNA together Figure 6.

In order to insert or delete DNA, the middle primers are used to join two complementary sections together, for a point mutation this is simply encoded in the middle primers. This technique uses two rounds or stages of PCR resulting in a piece on DNA, which is mutated in a specific way either by insertion, deletion or point mutation Figure 6. In all cases, primers which overlap and contain matching sequences are used to join the DNA together as shown in more detail in Figure 4.

For deletion and point mutation, the two first round PCRs are done in separate tubes and combined for the second round in the same way as they are for the insertion. Like restriction endonucleases, this pathway evolved as a mechanism for bacteria to avoid phage viral infection. Cas9 is an enzyme that cuts double-stranded DNA and it does so at a specific point. By designing and synthesising guide RNAs, we can use the Cas9 enzyme to cut at a specific place in a genome Figure 7.

This ability is significant as it opens up the possibility of direct genome editing within a cell. The enzyme cuts the DNA forming a double strand break. From this two possible things can occur. One option is non-homologous end joining where the DNA is joined back together. This can occur imprecisely and if so a mutation is introduced into the target gene. The second option is homology-directed repair, which uses a piece of DNA, which matches both sides of the break as a template for the repair.

This process enables accurate DNA editing. In order for the mutation to be made, once Cas9 has catalysed the specific break in the DNA, the DNA repair mechanism in the cell then kicks in to repair this break. The result of this is that while the CRISPR-Cas9 system does mutate a specific gene, there is no control over the type of mutation that is caused as this depends on the DNA repair system. In non-homologous end joining, the ends of the DNA are processed to make them compatible and the two ends joined by DNA ligase.

This can result in the loss of genetic material. In homology-directed repair, a piece of DNA which shows homology to both sides of the break is used as a template for the repair. Thus depending of what DNA repair occurs depends on how specific the type of mutation is. The challenge of promoting one type of repair over another is currently a hot topic of research, with the aim of promoting homology-directed repair to enable specific genome editing. This refers to the ability of the guide RNA to bind elsewhere within a genome, this depends on their being similar sequences elsewhere in the genome.

If it does then you could get mutations at this location in addition to your target mutation. Thus the guide RNA requires careful design. Recombinant DNA technology and genetic modification are rarely out of the media spotlight be this through genetically modified crops, genetically modified mosquitos, the use of genome editing in humans or the role the DNA forensic technology is having in the world of crime.

Recombinant technology is already in regular use in the production of medicines such as insulin and in the production of the anti-malarial drug artemisinin. While the potential benefits of the technology are huge, it must be noted that there are potential problems, both safety and ethical, which need to be taken into account prior to use.

With the production of chemicals such as arteminisin, we also have the interesting issue of making this in the developed world removes jobs from the developing world where the plant containing it is cultivated. The genetic modification of plants both for food and other uses remains contentious. Plants have also been designed to produce vaccines.

Golden Rice was developed to provide a source of vitamin A for people with diets that lack vitamin A; akin to flour fortification with vitamin B1 in the U. Using these plants is not without problems both in terms of the potential issues with the release of a genetically modified organism, the interaction with other organisms, alongside potential conflicts of interest of agri-tech and farmers. For example, there is the question of interbreeding and should the genetically modified plants be able to breed.

If they are able to breed then they could inter-breed with non-modified plants and produce unforeseen effects. If the genetically modified plants are made sterile then farmers are dependent on the seed manufacturer each year for seed rather than being able to derive them from a plant. Some genetically modified plants provide herbicide resistance, enabling the use of herbicides to kill unwanted plants, but this again increases farmers dependence on herbicides and increases their use in the environment.

With these plants, there is also the danger that if the GM plants are able to breed with wild plants the gene enabling plants to be resistant to the herbicide may be released into wild plants and thus reduce the effectiveness of the herbicide in the wider environment. Some of these concerns stem from the potential for unforeseen interactions resulting from the modification or that the supplementation may not result in successfully curing the dietary deficiency. As can be seen from the companion article of genetic basis for disease [ 2 ], the ability to use these techniques to test for inherited genetic disorders is important and indeed is forming a bigger and bigger role in our healthcare.

The genomes project, launched by the U. Other projects such as East London genes and health uses sequencing to find natural mutants within our populations for study [ 4 ]. By finding people who already have mutations in genes, who live naturally in our population, we can use cells derived from them, reducing our need to modify genes and further adding to our knowledge of how genes interact.

With the cost of genome sequencing constantly falling, it is likely that it will become the norm, as part of personalised healthcare. Indeed this may also move into the realm of preventative medicine, but here we have the ethical issue that containing a gene may only give a chance of disease and at what point do you decide to act.

A further discussion of this can be found in the article of genetic disease [ 2 ]. There is also the ethical issue of both privacy and ownership of genetic information. They will pass this onto any children they have and the process around them does raise some challenging ethical issues around consent and who decides what we should modify amongst others.

There is also the question in this case as it is not a full deletion if the truncated protein may have safety effects. Overall, the impact of genetic understanding and modification on society throws up a challenging set of issues where both the potential benefit and potential harm to both the individuals involved and society must be weighed up.

The ability to sequence genomes in large numbers is continuing to change the questions we can answer and the new experiments we can design. Our ability to make precise DNA edits both for the purposes of study and application is constantly getting better and more accurate.

This technology opens up the possibility of both personalised medicine and designer organisms and crops. This article is an updated version of the first Biochemical Society guide to recombinant DNA technology written by Peter Moore in Sign In or Create an Account. Advanced Search.

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Also renal transplantation, Gaucher disease, hemophilia, Alport syndrome, renal fibrosis, and some other diseases are under consideration for gene therapy [ ]. Recombinant DNA technology is an important development in science that has made the human life much easier. In recent years, it has advanced strategies for biomedical applications such as cancer treatment, genetic diseases, diabetes, and several plants disorders especially viral and fungal resistance. The role of recombinant DNA technology in making environment clean phytoremediation and microbial remediation and enhanced resistace of plants to different adverse acting factors drought, pests, and salt has been recognized widely.

The improvements it brought not only in humans but also in plants and microorganisms are very significant. The challenges in improving the products at gene level sometimes face serious difficulties which are needed to be dealt for the betterment of the recombinant DNA technology future. In pharmaceuticals, especially, there are serious issues to produce good quality products as the change brought into a gene is not accepted by the body.

Moreover, in case of increasing product it is not always positive because different factors may interfere to prevent it from being successful. Considering health issues, the recombinant technology is helping in treating several diseases which cannot be treated in normal conditions, although the immune responses hinder achieving good results.

Several difficulties are encountered by the genetic engineering strategies which needed to be overcome by more specific gene enhancement according to the organism's genome. The integration of incoming single-stranded DNA into the bacterial chromosome would be carried out by a RecA-dependent process. This requires sequence homology between both entities, the bacterial chromosome and incoming DNA. Stable maintenance and reconstitution of plasmid could be made easy.

The introduction of genetic material from one source into the other is a disaster for safety and biodiversity. There are several concerns over development of genetically engineered plants and other products. Further, concerns exist that genetic engineering has dangerous health implications. Thus, further extensive research is required in this field to overcome such issues and resolve the concerns of common people. The corresponding author is thankful to Xuan H. The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper.

National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Journal List Int J Genomics v. Int J Genomics. Published online Dec 8. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes. Introduction Human life is greatly affected by three factors: deficiency of food, health problems, and environmental issues.

Recombinant DNA Technology Recombinant DNA technology comprises altering genetic material outside an organism to obtain enhanced and desired characteristics in living organisms or as their products. Open in a separate window. Figure 1. Illustration of various applications of recombinant DNA technology.

Current Research Progress Recombinant DNA technology is a fast growing field and researchers around the globe are developing new approaches, devices, and engineered products for application in different sectors including agriculture, health, and environment. Food and Agriculture Recombinant DNA technology has major uses which made the manufacturing of novel enzymes possible which are suitable in conditions for specified food-processing. Health and Diseases Recombinant DNA technology has wide spectrum of applications in treating diseases and improving health conditions.

The following sections describe the important breakthroughs of recombinant DNA technology for the improvement of human health: 4. Gene Therapy Gene therapy is an advanced technique with therapeutic potential in health services. Production of Antibodies and Their Derivatives Plant systems have been recently used for the expression and development of different antibodies and their derivatives. Investigation of the Drug Metabolism Complex system of drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the drug metabolism is crucial to be investigated for the proper efficacy and effects of drugs.

Development of Vaccines and Recombinant Hormones Comparatively conventional vaccines have lower efficacy and specificity than recombinant vaccine. Chinese Medicines As an important component of alternative medicine, traditional chines medicines play a crucial role in diagnostics and therapeutics.

Medically Important Compounds in Berries Improvement in nutritional values of strawberries has been carried through rolC gene. Environment Genetic engineering has wide applications in solving the environmental issues. Phytoremediation and Plant Resistance Development Genetic engineering has been widely used for the detection and absorption of contaminants in drinking water and other samples.

Energy Applications Several microorganisms, specifically cyanobacteria, mediate hydrogen production, which is environmental friendly energy source. Current Challenges and Future Prospects The fact that microbial cells are mostly used in the production of recombinant pharmaceutical indicates that several obstacles come into their way restricting them from producing functional proteins efficiently but these are handled with alterations in the cellular systems.

Conclusions Recombinant DNA technology is an important development in science that has made the human life much easier. Competing Interests The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper. References 1. Kumar S. Role of genetic engineering in agriculture.

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Restifo N. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: harnessing the T cell response. Nature Reviews Immunology. Kershaw M. Gene-engineered T cells for cancer therapy. Nature Reviews Cancer. Danilo M. Jun L. Kreijtz J. A single immunization with modified vaccinia virus Ankara-based influenza virus H7 vaccine affords protection in the influenza A H7N9 pneumonia ferret model. The Journal of Infectious Diseases. Hughes J. Viral gene therapy for head and neck cancer.

Smith J. Human Macrophage Genetic Engineering. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology. Cereal crops as viable production and storage systems for pharmaceutical scFv antibodies. Plant Molecular Biology. Vaquero C. A carcinoembryonic antigen-specific diabody produced in tobacco. Karrer E. Patent No. Ionescu R. Contribution of variable domains to the stability of humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies.

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King J. Rapid, sensitive bioluminescent reporter technology for naphthalene exposure and biodegradation. Chatterjee J. Biotechnological applications of bacterial bioluminescence lux genes. Photochemistry and Photobiology. Matsui K. Enhancement of phosphate absorption by garden plants by genetic engineering: a new tool for phytoremediation. BioMed Research International. Horsch R. A simple and general method for transferring genes into plants. Tamura M. Jez J. The next green movement: plant biology for the environment and sustainability.

Clemens S. Toxic heavy metal and metalloid accumulation in crop plants and foods. Annual Review of Plant Biology. Kim E. Oligomerization between BSU1 family members potentiates brassinosteroid signaling in Arabidopsis. Molecular Plant. Mani D. Biotechnological advances in bioremediation of heavy metals contaminated ecosystems: an overview with special reference to phytoremediation.

International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology. Structural and physico-mechanical characterization of bio-cellulose produced by a cell-free system. Carbohydrate Polymers. Innovative production of bio-cellulose using a cell-free system derived from a single cell line. Metabolic engineering of synthetic cell-free systems: strategies and applications.

Tiwari A. Cyanobacterial hydrogen production—a step towards clean environment. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. Savakis P. Engineering cyanobacteria for direct biofuel production from CO 2. Current Opinion in Biotechnology. The improvements it brought not only in humans but also in plants and microorganisms are very significant. The challenges in improving the products at gene level sometimes face serious difficulties which are needed to be dealt for the betterment of the recombinant DNA technology future.

In pharmaceuticals, especially, there are serious issues to produce good quality products as the change brought into a gene is not accepted by the body. Moreover, in case of increasing product it is not always positive because different factors may interfere to prevent it from being successful.

Considering health issues, the recombinant technology is helping in treating several diseases which cannot be treated in normal conditions, although the immune responses hinder achieving good results. The integration of incoming single-stranded DNA into the bacterial chromosome would be carried out by a RecA-dependent process. This requires sequence homology between both entities, the bacterial chromosome and incoming DNA.

Stable maintenance and reconstitution of plasmid could be made easy. The introduction of genetic material from one source into the other is a disaster for safety and biodiversity. There are several concerns over development of genetically engineered plants and other products. Further, concerns exist that genetic engineering has dangerous health implications. Thus, further extensive research is required in this field to overcome such issues and resolve the concerns of common people. The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper.

The corresponding author is thankful to Xuan H. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of , as selected by our Chief Editors.

Read the winning articles. Journal overview. Special Issues. Academic Editor: Wenqin Wang. Received 10 Aug Revised 21 Oct Accepted 06 Nov Published 08 Dec Abstract In the past century, the recombinant DNA technology was just an imagination that desirable characteristics can be improved in the living bodies by controlling the expressions of target genes.

Introduction Human life is greatly affected by three factors: deficiency of food, health problems, and environmental issues. Recombinant DNA Technology Recombinant DNA technology comprises altering genetic material outside an organism to obtain enhanced and desired characteristics in living organisms or as their products.

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Kim, J. Youn, C.

ACADEMIC ESSAY WRITING HELP

Think, entry level researcher resume sample apologise

Genetically modified food products can be given a longer shelf life through altering the genetics of an organism. To farmers, and a world with a growing population, genetically modified crops are looking more and more attractive. There is concern about the safety and ethics of genetically modified and engineered organisms. In many European countries, GM foods are clearly labeled, in the US and Canada, there is no mandatory labeling laws for genetically engineered foods or products Federici, Scientific data has indicated in some circumstances that animals fed by GM crops have been harmed or died.

GM seeds, once planted, and harvested, yield seeds of their own and often mix with wild, organic seeds, thus producing offspring that are hybrids of the genetically modified organism. Loss of biodiversity due to the GM resistant strains overtaking natural plant breeds in nature is a serious concern for environmentalists and biologists Burke, Although the biological advancements in medicine and science have greatly improved the quality of life of humans, the effects of genetically modified foods and GM animals is concerning.

By providing vaccines otherwise unavailable to humans through biotechnology, many people experience longer then expected life spans. Usefulness of recombinant DNA technology in the worlds healthcare system can not be denied. I would disagree that sufficient data exists to be exploiting the science of biotechnology as vastly as humans have.

Biotechnology researchers think they have found a way to reverse the world famine. This way is through genetically modified foods which are foods Genetically Modified crops have an impact on birds and insect. A crop plant modified AND E. Brooklyn Journal Of International Law, 35 2 , Enhancing understanding of recombinant DNA technology. Genetically Modified Foods and Social Concerns.

Avicenna Journal Of Medical Biotechnology, 3 3 , Blimps dropped bombs, airplanes The original design was modified to an air-cooled version and extensively used as an Biotechnology Position Paper Genetically engineered and modified foods are not only one of the worlds prime Genetically altering foods is the process of modifying crops by These new proteins are Engineered foods, but that is not true.

The world today produces more food per Europe, they took with them plants and food native to the new world. Foods like the tomato, corn, potatoes, chili peppers Cordell, Linda S. Couscous is a staple food throughout. Couscous was elected as the third Falafel is a traditional Middle Eastern food, usually served in a pita, which acts Food from around the world Prepared by: Safa Laghoub Bobotie Papers People. Wide ranging plasmid bearing the Pseudomonas aeruginosa tryptophan synthase genes. Save to Library.

By sequencing a 1. It encodes a polypeptide of amino acids with an Mr of 20, The base composition of the pat gene is typical for Streptomyces [ Translation of pat is initiated by a GTG codon which was identified by frameshift mutations in Escherichia coli as well as in Streptomyces lividans.

Significant homology of the pat gene was found to the bialaphos-resistance gene bar of Streptomyces hygroscopicus [Thompson et al. Since Pt is a potent herbicide, the pat gene was modified and introduced into Nicotiana tabacum by Agrobacterium-mediated leaf-disc transformation. Subsequently the modified pat-coding region was fused to the 35S promoter of the cauliflower mosaic virus.

Transgenic plants could directly be selected on Pt-containing medium. Antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics are frequently used to maintain plasmid vectors in bacterial hosts such as Escherichia coli. Due to the risk of spread of antibiotic resistance, the regulatory authorities discourage the use of Overexpression of E.

Unfortunately, overexpression of fabI cannot be used to select medium -copy number plasmids, typically used for the expression of heterologous proteins in E. Here we report that Vibrio cholera FabV, a functional homologue of E. Light regulation of plant gene expression by an upstream enhancer-like element. Isolation and characterization of human actin genes cloned in phage lambda vectors. Using Drosophila and chicken actin probes, we have selected 14 human actin lambda recombinants from a genomic library.

We present a restriction maps indicating the positions of the sequences homologous to actin and to an Alu probe We present a restriction maps indicating the positions of the sequences homologous to actin and to an Alu probe. Restriction mapping has revealed that nine out of ten of these clones are distinct, indicating that actin is a multigene family. Hybrid elution of HeLa cell mRNA from filters containing the recombinant DNA, followed by in vitro translation and immunoprecipitation, as well as one- or two-dimensional protein analysis, shows that these recombinants code for actin.

Hybridization back to human DNA digested with restriction enzymes shows that the EcoRI fragments of at least one of the lambda recombinants lambda HA-5 result in similar-sized human DNA fragments in the intact genome. In nuclei, a 4. Recombinant DNA technology is an essential area of life engineering. The main aim of research in this field is to experimentally explore the possibilities of repairing damaged human DNA, healing or enhancing future human bodies.

Based on Based on ethnographic research in a Czech biochemical laboratory, the article explores biotechnological corporealities and their specific ontology through dealings with bio-objects, the bodywork of scientists. Using the complementary concepts of utopia and heterotopia, the text addresses the situation of bodies and bio-objects in a laboratory. Embodied utopias are analyzed as material semiotic phenomena that are embodied by scientists in their visions and emotions and that are related to potential bodies and to future, not-yet-actualized embodiments.

As a counterpart to this, the text explores embodied heterotopias, which are always the other spaces, like biotechnological bio-objects that are simulated in computers or stored in special solutions. The dihydrofolate reductase domain of Plasmodium falciparum thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase.

Gene synthesis, expression, and anti-folate-resistant mutants. A base pair gene coding for the 27,dalton dihydrofolate reductase DHFR domain of the thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase TS-DHFR bifunctional protein of Plasmodium falciparum was designed to have Escherichia coli A base pair gene coding for the 27,dalton dihydrofolate reductase DHFR domain of the thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase TS-DHFR bifunctional protein of Plasmodium falciparum was designed to have Escherichia coli codon preference and multiple unique restriction sites and was chemically synthesized.

The refolded DHFR was purified by methotrexate-Sepharose affinity chromatography to give the homogeneous enzyme. Active site titration with methotrexate revealed that the purified protein was fully active. The purified DHFR migrates as a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with apparent mass of approximately 30 kDa, and gel filtration showed that the protein is a monomer.