effective homework strategies for students

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Effective homework strategies for students

The simplest incentive system is reminding the child of a fun activity to do when homework is done. It may be a favorite television show, a chance to spend some time with a video or computer game, talking on the telephone or instant messaging, or playing a game with a parent. Having something to look forward to can be a powerful incentive to get the hard work done. When parents remind children of this as they sit down at their desks they may be able to spark the engine that drives the child to stick with the work until it is done.

Elaborate incentive systems. These involve more planning and more work on the part of parents but in some cases are necessary to address more significant homework problems. These systems work best when parents and children together develop them. Giving children input gives them a sense of control and ownership, making the system more likely to succeed.

We have found that children are generally realistic in setting goals and deciding on rewards and penalties when they are involved in the decision-making process. Building in breaks. These are good for the child who cannot quite make it to the end without a small reward en route. When creating the daily homework schedule, it may be useful with these children to identify when they will take their breaks.

Some children prefer to take breaks at specific time intervals every 15 minutes , while others do better when the breaks occur after they finish an activity. If you use this approach, you should discuss with your child how long the breaks will last and what will be done during the breaks get a snack, call a friend, play one level on a video game. The Daily Homework Planner includes sections where breaks and end-of-homework rewards can be identified.

Building in choice. This can be an effective strategy for parents to use with children who resist homework. Choice can be incorporated into both the order in which the child agrees to complete assignments and the schedule they will follow to get the work done. Building in choice not only helps motivate children but can also reduce power struggles between parents and children. Describe the problem behaviors. Parents and children decide which behaviors are causing problems at homework time.

For some children putting homework off to the last minute is the problem; for others, it is forgetting materials or neglecting to write down assignments. Still others rush through their work and make careless mistakes, while others dawdle over assignments, taking hours to complete what should take only a few minutes. It is important to be as specific as possible when describing the problem behaviors.

The problem behavior should be described as behaviors that can be seen or heard; for instance, complains about h omework or rushes through homework, making many mistakes are better descriptors than has a bad attitude or is lazy.

Set a goal. Usually the goal relates directly to the problem behavior. Decide on possible rewards and penalties. Homework incentive systems work best when children have a menu of rewards to choose from, since no single reward will be attractive for long.

We recommend a point system in which points can be earned for the goal behaviors and traded in for the reward the child wants to earn. The bigger the reward, the more points the child will need to earn it. The menu should include both larger, more expensive rewards that may take a week or a month to earn and smaller, inexpensive rewards that can be earned daily. It may also be necessary to build penalties into the system. This is usually the loss of a privilege such as the chance to watch a favorite TV show or the chance to talk on the telephone to a friend.

Once the system is up and running, and if you find your child is earning more penalties than rewards, then the program needs to be revised so that your child can be more successful. Usually when this kind of system fails, we think of it as a design failure rather than the failure of the child to respond to rewards.

It may be a good idea if you are having difficulty designing a system that works to consult a specialist, such as a school psychologist or counselor, for assistance. Write a homework contract. When the contract is in place, it should reduce some of the tension parents and kids often experience around homework.

For instance, if part of the contract is that the child will earn a point for not complaining about homework, then if the child does complain, this should not be cause for a battle between parent and child: the child simply does not earn that point. Parents should also be sure to praise their children for following the contract.

It will be important for parents to agree to a contract they can live with; that is, avoiding penalties they are either unable or unwilling to impose e. We have found that it is a rare incentive system that works the first time. Parents should expect to try it out and redesign it to work the kinks out.

Eventually, once the child is used to doing the behaviors specified in the contract, the contract can be rewritten to work on another problem behavior. Your child over time may be willing to drop the use of an incentive system altogether. This is often a long-term goal, however, and you should be ready to write a new contract if your child slips back to bad habits once a system is dropped. Click here to download the homework planner and incentive sheet.

Topics A-Z » School » Articles. But in the back of their minds is a haunting menace that can put a damper on even the most definitive kickball victory. What is this looming cloud? Homework should reinforce classroom learning, but not all assignments are effective.

The sad irony, then, is that homework meant to raise achievement often can end up lowering it. So how can we make homework more effective? The strategies recommended by experts may surprise you. Make homework more like taking a traditional test, or even listening to an in-class lecture?

According to research findings, the answer is "yes. Typically a teacher presents an entire lesson, students take notes and complete class work, and then they do homework to reinforce learning. Once the lesson is over, the student may not need the information again until an exam. With spaced repetition , educators present shorter segments on multiple topics, and these topics are then repeated over time. For example, a teacher speaking about the Industrial Revolution would not move on from it permanently.

A few weeks later, she might assign homework that asks kids what they remember about the Revolution and how they can apply that knowledge to better understand trends in contemporary manufacturing. Later in the school year, the teacher might give another assignment that requires students to complete a Venn diagram comparing the Industrial Revolution to a revolution from a different period of history. Teachers commonly use exams only in a summative fashion, as a way to assess achievement.

Instead, they do frequent self-assessment to give themselves multiple opportunities to retrieve the information from memory. Every time kids pull up a memory, that memory actually gets stronger. Try designing homework assignments that focus less on information input and more on getting students to pull that information out of their brains. For example, ask kids to complete an online quiz, identify areas in which they scored lowest, and create a plan to give themselves more practice in those areas.

Or have students write quiz questions, post them on a class social media platform, and answer them as a group. The flipped classroom redefines the very concept of homework—instead of traditional paper-and-pencil tasks, assignments involve video lectures that students view at home as many times as they choose. With class time freed up, students have greater opportunity to ask the teacher questions and participate in hands-on and collaborative work that reinforces learning.

Kids who are behind in a class or who need differentiated activities also will have a better chance of getting the help they need. In addition to the above strategies, researchers have identified additional general best practices when it comes to making homework count. Leave this field blank. Search Search. Newsletter Sign Up. Columnists All Columnists Ken Shore School Issues: Glossary. Search form Search. Retrieval practice Teachers commonly use exams only in a summative fashion, as a way to assess achievement.

Flipping the classroom The flipped classroom redefines the very concept of homework—instead of traditional paper-and-pencil tasks, assignments involve video lectures that students view at home as many times as they choose. Checklist for good homework assignments In addition to the above strategies, researchers have identified additional general best practices when it comes to making homework count. Good assignments: Are given not simply as a matter of routine, but only when there is a clear purpose for enhancing student learning.

Offer adequate feedback on what students have mastered, and what they still need to practice. Web-based platforms offer an easy way for kids to get instant feedback. For traditional assignments, set aside class time for students to correct, discuss and reflect upon their homework answers. With the exception of flipped-classroom videos clearly relate to material already taught in class.

Are explained thoroughly in terms of directions and expectations before students leave class. Trending Report Card Comments It's report card time and you face the prospect of writing constructive, insightful, and original comments on a couple dozen report cards or more. Here are positive report card comments for you to use and adapt! Struggling Students? You've reached the end of another grading period, and what could be more daunting than the task of composing insightful, original, and unique comments about every child in your class?

The following positive statements will help you tailor your comments to specific children and highlight their strengths. You can also use our statements to indicate a need for improvement. Turn the words around a bit, and you will transform each into a goal for a child to work toward. Sam cooperates consistently with others becomes Sam needs to cooperate more consistently with others, and Sally uses vivid language in writing may instead read With practice, Sally will learn to use vivid language in her writing.

Make Jan seeks new challenges into a request for parental support by changing it to read Please encourage Jan to seek new challenges. Whether you are tweaking statements from this page or creating original ones, check out our Report Card Thesaurus [see bottom of the page] that contains a list of appropriate adjectives and adverbs. There you will find the right words to keep your comments fresh and accurate.

We have organized our report card comments by category. Read the entire list or click one of the category links below to jump to that list. Behavior The student: cooperates consistently with the teacher and other students. Character The student: shows respect for teachers and peers. Group Work The student: offers constructive suggestions to peers to enhance their work. Interests and Talents The student: has a well-developed sense of humor. Participation The student: listens attentively to the responses of others.

Social Skills The student: makes friends quickly in the classroom. Time Management The student: tackles classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized manner. Work Habits The student: is a conscientious, hard-working student. Student Certificates! Recognize positive attitudes and achievements with personalized student award certificates!

Report Card Thesaurus Looking for some great adverbs and adjectives to bring to life the comments that you put on report cards? Go beyond the stale and repetitive With this list, your notes will always be creative and unique. Adjectives attentive, capable, careful, cheerful, confident, cooperative, courteous, creative, dynamic, eager, energetic, generous, hard-working, helpful, honest, imaginative, independent, industrious, motivated, organized, outgoing, pleasant, polite, resourceful, sincere, unique Adverbs always, commonly, consistently, daily, frequently, monthly, never, occasionally, often, rarely, regularly, typically, usually, weekly.

Included: A stadium full of activities and links to team sites, baseball math sites, cross-curricular projects -- and even the famous Abbott and Costello "Who's On First? For students, the welcome warmth of the spring sun, the tantalizing sight of green grass and manicured base lines, the far off sound of a bat meeting a ball, the imagined scent of popcorn and hotdogs, can be powerful distracters.

Desperate measures are called for! Bring the game into the classroom -- and score a home run -- with this week's Education World lessons and activities. Although most are designed for students in grades 5 and above, many can be adapted for younger students as well. Discuss how sports affect the lives of fans as well as players. Ask students to tell about an occasion when sports positively or negatively affected their own lives. Students might also be inspired to write their own poems about baseball.

SEDGWICK ESSAY

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIPS IN SCHOOLS ESSAYS

If possible, the homework center should include a bulletin board that can hold a monthly calendar on which your child can keep track of longterm assignments. Allowing children some leeway in decorating the homework center can help them feel at home there, but you should be careful that it does not become too cluttered with distracting materials.

Step 3. Establish a homework time. Your child should get in the habit of doing homework at the same time every day. The time may vary depending on the individual child. Some children need a break right after school to get some exercise and have a snack. Others need to start homework while they are still in a school mode i. In general, it may be best to get homework done either before dinner or as early in the evening as the child can tolerate. The later it gets, the more tired the child becomes and the more slowly the homework gets done.

Step 4. Establish a daily homework schedule. In general, at least into middle school, the homework session should begin with your sitting down with your child and drawing up a homework schedule. You should review all the assignments and make sure your child understands them and has all the necessary materials. Ask your child to estimate how long it will take to complete each assignment.

Then ask when each assignment will get started. If your child needs help with any assignment , then this should be determined at the beginning so that the start times can take into account parent availability. A Daily Homework Planner is included at the end of this handout and contains a place for identifying when breaks may be taken and what rewards may be earned. Many children who are not motivated by the enjoyment of doing homework are motivated by the high grade they hope to earn as a result of doing a quality job.

Thus, the grade is an incentive, motivating the child to do homework with care and in a timely manner. For children who are not motivated by grades, parents will need to look for other rewards to help them get through their nightly chores. Incentive systems fall into two categories: simple and elaborate. Simple incentive systems. The simplest incentive system is reminding the child of a fun activity to do when homework is done.

It may be a favorite television show, a chance to spend some time with a video or computer game, talking on the telephone or instant messaging, or playing a game with a parent. Having something to look forward to can be a powerful incentive to get the hard work done.

When parents remind children of this as they sit down at their desks they may be able to spark the engine that drives the child to stick with the work until it is done. Elaborate incentive systems. These involve more planning and more work on the part of parents but in some cases are necessary to address more significant homework problems.

These systems work best when parents and children together develop them. Giving children input gives them a sense of control and ownership, making the system more likely to succeed. We have found that children are generally realistic in setting goals and deciding on rewards and penalties when they are involved in the decision-making process.

Building in breaks. These are good for the child who cannot quite make it to the end without a small reward en route. When creating the daily homework schedule, it may be useful with these children to identify when they will take their breaks. Some children prefer to take breaks at specific time intervals every 15 minutes , while others do better when the breaks occur after they finish an activity. If you use this approach, you should discuss with your child how long the breaks will last and what will be done during the breaks get a snack, call a friend, play one level on a video game.

The Daily Homework Planner includes sections where breaks and end-of-homework rewards can be identified. Building in choice. This can be an effective strategy for parents to use with children who resist homework. Choice can be incorporated into both the order in which the child agrees to complete assignments and the schedule they will follow to get the work done. Building in choice not only helps motivate children but can also reduce power struggles between parents and children.

Describe the problem behaviors. Parents and children decide which behaviors are causing problems at homework time. For some children putting homework off to the last minute is the problem; for others, it is forgetting materials or neglecting to write down assignments.

Still others rush through their work and make careless mistakes, while others dawdle over assignments, taking hours to complete what should take only a few minutes. It is important to be as specific as possible when describing the problem behaviors.

The problem behavior should be described as behaviors that can be seen or heard; for instance, complains about h omework or rushes through homework, making many mistakes are better descriptors than has a bad attitude or is lazy.

Set a goal. On one occasion, I was in an elementary school classroom watching a lesson on fractions. Do the rest for homework. Homework is more effective when the focus is on quality as opposed to quantity.

More is not necessarily better, particularly when students are just beginning to understand a concept. Perfect practice makes perfect. I would prefer to give my students small opportunities to show me they understand so that I can build on that foundation in the future.

Effective homework assignments extend, reinforce, or preview content. If students have mastered the material, you may choose to assign an independent project to enhance their understanding or allow them to apply their knowledge. After a unit on creating spreadsheets, you might ask students to build a budget using a spreadsheet.

However, if students are just beginning to understand a skill, you may want them to complete additional practice to reinforce the knowledge. When I taught parts of speech, for example, I would ask students to find examples in newspapers or magazines and bring them to class. At times, my homework previewed upcoming content. For example, one day, I asked my students to make a list of places that they or their family had visited.

The next day, when we discussed the regions of the state, we plotted their vacation sites on the map and categorized them by region. Effective homework can be completed independently with minimal and appropriate support. If the assignment is too difficult, students are more likely to ask someone else to complete it for them.

When I taught, I tried to create homework assignments that allowed for family members to be involved, but in an appropriate way. For example, I would ask students to write a paragraph and then ask someone else to read it and tell them whether they had clearly stated the main idea. Or, students would interview a family member or a friend about a topic, and we used the responses in our lessons to provide context or build background.

This leads directly to the sixth principle—ownership. Students are more likely to feel as though they have a stake in the assignment if it has some direct link to their lives. This may not be a formal grade; sometimes informal feedback is far more effective. But students need the opportunity to share and receive feedback on work they have completed, even if it is by sharing their answers with a partner or a small group.

All of these characteristics add up to kid-friendly homework. Although the exact format of your homework may depend on the age and skill level of each student, generally, effective homework is practical, doable, and interesting. Students will likely never ask for you to assign homework. However, if we show them why the homework is important, create homework that allows each student to be successful, and then use the homework as an integral part of learning, students are more likely to complete the assignment.

An internationally recognized expert in the areas of instruction, rigor, student motivation, and leadership, she collaborates with schools and districts for professional development on-site and via technology.

Homework has been the buzz word for every educational stakeholder since long.

Rtbf resume pblv Try having kids approach the material in a different way. Because differences are our greatest strength. Step 3. But it's a kid's job to do the learning. Sai Prabhas Mallidi. Polloway, E.
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Effective homework strategies for students Talking through the classroom routine write drama resume home would be helpful. These are good for the child who cannot quite make it to the end without a small reward en route. Checklist for good homework assignments In addition to the above strategies, researchers have identified additional general best practices when it comes to making homework count. Richa Tiwari. Why support Understood? The Great American Pastime has something for everyone -- on or off the field.
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